7+ Questions To Ask When Your Hire A Designer

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Graphic designing may be a thrilling and engaging field, but it isn’t something that you can get right off the bat, especially if you’re a startup company. Even if you happen to know the basics, it’s not enough to produce a professional website, one that’s quality-driven, efficient and fast-loading.

With that being said, it would do your business a long-term good if you hired a top-of-the-class graphic designer. Though you will only get to work with them temporarily, the impact that they will deliver to your company could last for a lifetime. This is because the image or images created by this one person will be the first thing that potential customers will see when discovering your business and potentially become lifers.

But remember, not all graphic designers are legit as some of them could be crooks trying to con you out of your hard-earned greens. To determine if they’re the real deal, see if they can answer the following questions courtesy of LogoDesign.net:

  1. How Do You Approach A New Project?

    A good design is all about solving problems. Some of those problems could be a bit broad like wanting a friendlier image or something that’s now black-and-white such as meeting a sales quota.

    The point is that every new designer has to understand the needs of the client – in other words, a problem that needs solving – before deciding to accept a project. So look for designers who answer this question by referring to finding solutions: speaking with the team, researching user data, looking through archives of old design work, etc

  2. What Kind Of Design Software Programs Have You Worked With?



    The main goal above all else is to determine if they have worked on a high-in-demand design software program. If not that, then at least they have experience working with Photoshop, InDesign or Illustrator as you’ll likely have one of those in your office systems. There are two ways you and the graphic designer can benefit from working on the same programs: it simplifies the design process, and you can easily make alterations to it afterward if need be.

  3. What’s Your Graphic Design Process?



    Here, you want to know the timeline that goes into the process of graphic designing, what they do in what order and what type of role they envision you to play in the process. You are also interested to know where revisions and critiques are utilized into the plan and also the estimated time for that step in the process as it varies quite a bit from client to client as well as project to project


  4. Do You Welcome Client Involvement Or Not?



    There are some designers who prefer consulting with clients at every step of their design process and there are those who just prefer complete creative freedom and control, so they know what to expect ahead of time. It’s one thing to collaborate with a person and trusting in their abilities, but it’s a problem if they micromanage everything along the way.


  5. How Do You Keep Up To Date In The Field?



    Successful businesses are those that stay on top of new and popular trends as well as deliver quality products. That is the basis for this question. You have to ensure that your potential designer is someone who always stays ahead of others in the graphic design field, whether it’s reading graphic design magazines, visiting message boards, as well as reading blog posts by those respected in and knowledgeable about the field. Even though this is important in every field, it is especially essential for those in the graphic designing business as anything having to do with computers is always changing and being up-to-date. You can also ask if they have learned a new software recently and are expanding their knowledge base around it.


  6. Can You Work Within The Budget?



    This is a rather simple question that will likely produce a simple answer. But it is still important to ask since graphic design fees can vary quite a bit. For example, a recent college graduate may ask for about $25 per hours whereas one from a high-end agency may ask for almost 10 times the amount. Also, ask if they charge by the hour or by the project. The latter is more preferable as you can then budget it before the project starts.


  7. What Kind Of Qualities Do You Look For In a Client?



    In order to better understand what they expect from their clients, or would be best to see things from their perspective. You can ask them about all the good and bad qualities that they like and dislike in their employers. This provides insight into all of the things that irk them so you can avoid them before they become a problem.


    Remember, there are no wrong answers and you only want to know how well they’ll work with you instead of knowing what kind of designer they are. With that in mind, you can ask them if they have any objections or deal-breakers, whether it’s with the working process, your management style or logistical concerns, like with the payment methods.


  8. Which Design Projects Or Brands Do You Admire The Most?



    This is a very important question, but you have to word it in a way that is relevant to your project. If, for instance, you’re hiring a freelance designer to design a book cover for you, ask about if they’ve worked on any previous book covers for any renowned publisher and which ones they enjoyed working on the most.


    This question gives insight into your designer’s character: their artistic priorities, stylistic preferences, and comprehension of their own trade. It’s an excellent way to get straightforward answers to ensure if your tastes align.


    For this question, you also have to pay attention to how they describe their favorites. Do they use any sort of technical jargon and go into the particular aspects of the design, or do they simply say it “looks good” and just leave it as it is?


  9. After The Project Is Completed Would You Be Willing To Hand Over Your Source Files?



    The original files could prove to be quite useful once a project is completed, just in case you need to make any adjustments to the design that had been created. Hence the answer to this question could be an important one. But if you feel that there’s no need for any changes to be made, especially for something that has a limited shelf life, then this question feels less important.


 

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